Intergenerational Collaboration

How Mutual Mentorship Empowers Us to Come Up For Air.

In today's fast-paced world, it's easy to feel like you're constantly treading water. With endless demands for our time and attention, it's no wonder so many of us feel like we're just on a neverending treadmill, trying to get things done with no end in sight.

How Mutual Mentorship Empowers Us to Come Up For Air.

How To Be a Good Ancestor.

Two weeks before my father died, he called my mother over to him and asked her to bring a pen and paper. She later described his state at that time as being somewhere between this world and the next.

How To Be a Good Ancestor.

How You Can Give Back to Younger Folks in the Workplace.

Sometimes, we don’t know what’s missing until it sneaks up on us in our lives: iPhones, Airpods, Pickleball…

How You Can Give Back to Younger Folks in the Workplace.

The Re-Emergence of Intergenerational Friendships.

Let's face it, we didn't structure society to connect with people from other generations. CoGenerate founder and co-CEO Marc Freedman, who is teaching at MEA this fall, calls it "age-apartheid." You go to school with people your age, work for forty years with people roughly your age, and then live in a retirement community or nursing home with people the same age.

The Re-Emergence of Intergenerational Friendships.

What are the 5 Pieces of Wisdom You’d Offer Someone Younger?

One of the beauties of getting older is making sense of our experiences. Our painful lessons of the past become the raw material for our future wisdom. And not just our wisdom but the insight we pass on to those in our lives. After all, wisdom is not taught, it’s shared. So, how might you package up your metabolized experience and deliver it as distilled compassion to someone younger than you?

What are the 5 Pieces of Wisdom You’d Offer Someone Younger?

Eat, Talk, Change: Generations Over Dinner as Cultural Activism.

In his TED talk about the online curated-discussion experience, Death Over Dinner, Michael Hebb seeks to upgrade how the world manages death by inviting us to engage in “dinner table talk.”

Eat, Talk, Change: Generations Over Dinner as Cultural Activism.

Bosses Want Hard Workers—So They’re Hiring Older People

A recent Wall Street Journal article with the title of today’s blog got me thinking: is there a different work ethic for older versus younger employees, and if so, is that a new phenomenon? A survey of Americans’ values found that hard work is essential to three-quarters of older workers, while this drops to 61% for those 18 to 29. Many employers are taking note and are focusing on older workers again.

Bosses Want Hard Workers—So They’re Hiring Older People

The Potential Intergenerational Gift of MEA.

The Potential Inter-Generational Gift of MEA If you’re at the older end of your “second adulthood,” don’t rule out the experience of MEA. It may seem far-fetched to think about MEA as an intergenerational experience. That wasn’t my intent, but it ended up being an important part of the experience for me. In reflection, intergenerational connections have been an important part of my entire life.

The Potential Intergenerational Gift of MEA.

The Age of the Sage in the Workplace.

In 2019, 57% of Americans in their early 60s were still working. This number was just 46% in 2000. Improved health and shifting industry patterns—more jobs in offices, fewer in factories—played a significant role.

The Age of the Sage in the Workplace.

The Making of a Modern Menternship.

The Making of a Modern Menternship.